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BREAKING NEWS / UPDATE: Wausau police confirm Stephanie Low's body was found in Wabeno; person of interest Kristopher Torgerson to be charged with homicide

WAUSAU, Wis (WSAU)  Wausau police say Stephanie Low's body has been found. Police revealed at a news conference today that a person of interest in her death, Kristopher Torgerson, led police to her body on September 19th. The body has since been positively ID'ed by the state crime lab. The autopsy lists 'homicide' as the cause of death. Torgerson had been questioned nearly four years ago after she had first disappeared. Wausau PD say he was in custody on other charges, and agreed to sh...

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That's Hot: Paris Hilton settles Hallmark lawsuit


Paris Hilton waits in the courtroom at the Regional Justice Center in Las Vegas, September 20, 2010. REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus
Paris Hilton waits in the courtroom at the Regional Justice Center in Las Vegas, September 20, 2010. REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus

By Eriq Gardner

LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - Paris Hilton will be getting a little something in the mail from Hallmark this year.

The socialite has settled a lawsuit against the company over a greeting card that featured a scene seemingly ripped from her old reality show "The Simple Life." The caption read "Paris's First Day as a Waitress" and made a pun on her trademarked catch phrase, "That's Hot." In 2007, Hilton sued, claiming her publicity rights had been violated.

Last week, attorneys for Hilton and Hallmark advised a California judge that they had reached a settlement. A confidentiality provision limits the release of exact terms, but it's believed Hilton walked away with a favorable package.

When the heiress filed suit in 2007, Hallmark struck back with a free-speech defense.

The case made its way up to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which handed Hilton a huge legal victory last year. The appeals court rejected Hallmark's protected-speech argument and raised doubts that the greeting card was "transformative" expression. The case was remanded back to a lower court.

Since then, the two sides have been preparing for a December trial. Evidence was being collected to ascertain the commercial value of Hilton's endorsement.

Now, pending a judge's blessing, the case is over.

Hilton's name will be stamped in law review articles discussing the tricky balance between publicity rights and the First Amendment -- but we may never know exactly what Hilton's publicity is really worth.

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