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Youngstown shooting suspects will face murder charges

CLEVELAND (Reuters) - Two suspects in the deadly shooting of 12 people at a fraternity house in Youngstown, Ohio will face murder charges at a court hearing Tuesday, officials said on Monday.

The suspects, Braylon L. Rogers, 19, who turned himself in to police, and Columbus E. Jones Jr., 22, who was picked up at his home Sunday evening, will be charged with aggravated murder, felony assault and firing into a building, said Youngstown prosecutor Jay Macejko.

Jamail E. Johnson, 25, a student at Youngstown State University, was killed and 11 other people, including six Youngstown students, were wounded in a shooting early Sunday at a party at an off-campus fraternity house. Shavai Owens, 17, of Youngstown remains in critical condition.

The suspects, who were not Youngstown students, had been thrown out of a party at the house, police said. Macejko said the investigation continues.

University spokesman Ron Cole said the residence housed some members of the Omega Psi Phi fraternity, a university-sanctioned African-American fraternal organization.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich came to Youngstown Monday to meet Mayor Jay Williams and university president Cynthia Anderson about the shooting.

Speaking at a press conference at the university Monday, Kasich invoked the memory of his own parents who were killed by a drunk driver not far from Youngstown.

The governor said he didn't have all of the answers to the tragedy, "When someone stands in front of a building and opens fire, I don't understand it," he said.

He called on all members of the community including religious institutions to play a part in making the city safer. "The fact is that people don't have jobs and that creates hopelessness," he said.

(Reporting by Kim Palmer; Writing by Mary Wisniewski; Editing by Greg McCune)

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