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3-way race for state Supreme Court likely

by
The entrance to the Wisconsin Supreme Court inside the state Capitol is seen, Sept. 15, 2011. (courtesy of FOX 11).
The entrance to the Wisconsin Supreme Court inside the state Capitol is seen, Sept. 15, 2011. (courtesy of FOX 11).

UNDATED (WSAU)  A three-way primary for the Wisconsin Supreme Court is one step away from being assured. Incumbent Justice Pat Roggensack and challengers Ed Fallone and Vince Megna all filed their nomination papers by yesterday’s deadline. And if state election officials confirm that they have enough signatures, all three will square off in a February 19th primary.

Roggensack filed her papers last Friday. The other two filed yesterday, and they took digs at each other as well as Roggensack. Fallone, a Marquette law professor, criticized attorney Megna for declaring himself as a Democrat and opposing Wisconsin’s voter I-D law. Megna says voters deserve to know where he stands, and he also came out against assault rifles. But the Milwaukee Lemon Law attorney stopped short of saying how he’d rule on both issues if they come up before the Supreme Court.

The court’s supposed to impartial and non-partisan, but Roggensack is part of the court’s conservative majority – and former state Republican Party director Brandon Scholz is her campaign adviser. Fallone has two Democratic operatives on his side – Melissa Mulliken and Nathan Schwantes – but the candidate said he chose the two for their talents and not their party affiliations. Both Fallone and Megna say they want to restore civility to the Supreme Court, in the wake of the 2011 incident in which Justice David Prosser placed his hands around Justice Ann Walsh Bradley’s neck. Roggensack says the justices are getting along just fine. Scholz says the election should be about Roggensack’s experience – and not about Prosser’s and Bradley’s disagreements.

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